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Dentures

Why a Partial Denture

Considering Dentures for a Partial Arch
 
Partial arch
When several teeth are missing, we may recommend a partial denture for replacing them.
 
A partial can solve a number of problems caused by missing teeth.
 
Diagnosis and treatment
To determine if partial dentures are right for you, we perform a thorough exam of your teeth and gums. The exam typically includes xrays to check the health of your jawbone.
 
We also take impressions to create an accurate model of your mouth. In addition, we work with you to select the best color and shape for your new teeth.
 
There are several types of partials, so we will talk with you about the best type for your situation.
 
Problems caused by missing teeth
Missing teeth change the biting forces on teeth around the space. Neighboring teeth start to shift, and the opposing teeth begin to extrude out of their sockets.
 
These changes create places around the teeth that are hard to keep clean; so plaque and bacteria quickly accumulate. This accumulation can cause tooth decay and periodontal disease.
 
Changes in the bite can also put improper chewing forces on the shifted teeth, and this may lead to grinding, clenching and painful problems with your jaw joint, the TMJ. In addition, an uneven bite can make it hard to chew and
enjoy food.
 
Benefits of a partial
Partial dentures replace missing teeth, and this provides many benefits, including easier eating and clearer speech. The partials are removable for easier cleaning, and they are a good way to maintain a stable bite and restore a naturallooking smile.

Why a Full Arch Denture

Full denture
When all of your upper or lower teeth are missing, we may recommend a full denture for replacing them.
 
Dentures can be a good way to help you eat more easily, speak clearly, and have a naturallooking smile.
 
Diagnosis and treatment
To determine if dentures are right for you, we perform a thorough exam of your gums and any remaining teeth. The exam typically includes xrays to check the health of your jawbone. We also take impressions to create an accurate model of your mouth.
 
The best positions of the center line and lip line are recorded, so the denture teeth can be placed attractively. We will work with you to select the best color and shape for your new teeth.
 
There are several types of full dentures, so we will talk with you about the best type for your situation.
 
Benefits of dentures
Dentures replace missing teeth, and this provides many benefits, including easier eating and clearer peech. Dentures help your jaws work in their correct and most comfortable position; so dentures can promote the proper functioning of the jaw joints and muscles. In addition, dentures provide support for lips and cheeks, giving you a more youthful appearance.

Caring for your Dentures

 
 
Denture care
Now that you have received your denture, it is important to follow these recommendations to
ensure its success.
 
Chewing and eating
To protect your denture, avoid chewing ice or other hard objects.
 
If small pieces of food work their way under your denture while you eat, simply remove your
denture and rinse it with water.
 
Brushing and flossing
Brush your tongue, gums, palate, and any remaining teeth at least twice a day to keep them
free of plaque and bacteria. Brushing also massages the gums and keeps your breath fresh.
In addition, we may recommend dental floss, mouthrinses, or other cleaning aids.
 
Cleaning your denture
Clean your denture over a sink full of water to prevent your denture from breaking if it is accidentally dropped. Use a denture brush and a denture cleaning product at least once a day to thoroughly clean all of the surfaces of your denture. We may recommend special denture cleansers or brushes.
 
Also, soak your denture periodically in a commercial soaking solution, or, if your denture has no metal parts, you can soak it in a solution of half white vinegar and half water. After soaking, rinse dentures thoroughly in cool water.
 
Sleeping and storing your denture
Unless we tell you otherwise, remove your denture for sleeping or for at least 6 to 8 hours a day. Store your denture in water or a soaking solution whenever it is out of your mouth, so it does not dry out.
 
When to call us
Call us right away if your denture breaks, cracks, or chips, or if a tooth becomes loose, so we can properly repair it.  Also call us if your bite feels uneven, your dentures become loose, you have sore spots, irritation, swelling, or discomfort, or if you have any questions or concerns.

Post-op Instructions for Life with Dentures

Adjusting to new dentures
Now that you have your new dentures, here are some suggestions for living comfortably with them.
 
Some temporary problems are a normal part of adjusting to new dentures. However, with time and practice, you will make the adjustment to dentures and be eating and talking with confidence.
 
Regular dental visits
Plan on regular visits to our office so we can monitor the health of your mouth and the fit of your denture. We will also let you know when it is time to adjust, reline, or replace your denture.
 
When to call us
Call us if your bite feels uneven, your dentures become loose, you have persistent discomfort, you have any gagging that persists beyond the initial adjustment period, or if you have any questions or concerns.
 
Chewing and eating
For the first few months, while you are learning to chew with your denture, start with soft foods, then gradually add more variety. Continue to eat a healthy diet, including plenty of fruits, vegetables, and proteins. To make this easier, cut your food into small
bites.
 
Bite into foods with the side teeth, not the front teeth. If your denture tips when you chew, try keeping some food on both sides of your mouth to help balance the denture.
 
Occasionally, small pieces of food will work their way under your denture while you eat. Simply remove your denture and rinse it with water. To protect your denture, avoid chewing ice or other hard objects.
 
Speaking and staying comfortable
You may have difficulty speaking for a short while. If this happens, practice by reading aloud in front of a mirror until you are comfortable. You can also try speaking more slowly and quietly.
 
While your mouth gets used to the new denture, it may seem bulky, you may notice increased salivary flow, and your tongue will feel crowded. These sensations should pass with time. An upper denture causes some people to gag. Call us if this continues
beyond the initial adjustment period.
 
Cleaning and using adhesives
Clean your mouth and denture daily. We will give you complete instructions.
 
Denture adhesives are often not necessary with dentures that fit well. If you would like to try one, ask us about the best kind for your situation. If you do choose an adhesive, it is important to apply it to clean dentures and to thoroughly remove it every day.

Immediate Dentures

Immediate treatment
When all of your upper or lower teeth must be removed, an immediate denture is a good interim treatment for replacing them.
 
An immediate denture is one that is placed on the same day that the teeth are removed.
With proper home care and regular adjustments, your immediate denture can provide a good
short term treatment for a functional bite and a naturallooking smile.
 
The benefits of an immediate denture
mmediate dentures have several advantages. They protect your gums and help control bleeding after the teeth have been removed. You are never without teeth, so you’ll have a naturallooking appearance, and you won’t need to learn how to eat and speak without teeth. Dentures also support your cheeks and lips for a more attractive smile.
 
Placing an immediate denture
The process of making an immediate denture varies in each case, and it usually involves a series of appointments. To begin the process, an accurate model is made of your mouth before any teeth are removed. Then the model is modified to match the shape your gums will be after the teeth have been removed. The lab uses this model to create your new immediate denture.
 
The next phase is to thoroughly numb your mouth and extract the teeth. Depending on the circumstances, we may gently close the gums with stitches. Then we insert your new immediate denture.
 
You wear the denture continually for one to three days. It will probably feel tight because the gums are swollen. As the gums and jawbone change shape over the next several months, the surface of the denture will need to be relined at least once for a better fit.
 
When the time is right, we will talk with you about creating a new final denture.

Overdentures

There is a difference
When most of your teeth are missing or must be removed, an overdenture can be a good treatment for replacing them.
 
From the top, an overdenture looks like a conventional denture, but unlike a conventional denture, some teeth are retained, and the overdenture fits over these teeth.
 
With regular adjustments and careful attention to proper homecare, an overdenture can provide a functional bite and a naturallooking smile.
 
Placing an overdenture
The process of making an overdenture varies in each case, and it usually involves a series of steps and appointments.
 
The first step is to prepare the supporting teeth by removing the portion above the gumline.
 
Second, to prevent inflammation and infection, we perform root canal treatment on the teeth. We may also cover the teeth with small caps or attachments that help the denture stay in place.
 
In the third step we take impressions of your mouth, including the prepared teeth. An accurate model is made from these impressions, and the lab uses this model to create the overdenture base.
 
Fourth, in many cases, a wax rim is mounted on the base for you to try in. This helps confirm that the upper and lower teeth are correctly aligned.
 
Fifth, after the try in, the lab creates a waxup, which is a replica of the final denture. You try in the waxup, and we note any changes to the fit of the base and to the color, shape and placement of the teeth. We send the waxup back to the lab, and they process it to create the final overdenture.
 
Finally, when the overdenture is ready, you try it in, and we make any necessary adjustments here in the office.
 
The benefits of an overdenture
Overdentures have several advantages. Keeping some of your own teeth helps hold the denture in place and makes the denture feel more secure and natural. In addition, because we are able to retain some of your natural teeth, the overdenture slows the loss of jawbone that naturally occurs when teeth are missing. Dentures also provide support for cheeks and lips which give you a more attractive and youthful appearance.

Flexible Partial Dentures

Removable appliances
When several teeth in your upper or lower arch are missing, a flexible partial denture is a good treatment for replacing them. Flexible partials are removable appliances that are held in
place by gumcolored clasps that fit around the necks of the remaining teeth.
 
With proper home care and regular checkups, a flexible partial can provide a functional bite
and a naturallooking smile.
 
Placing a flexible partial
The process of making a flexible partial denture varies in each case, and it usually
involves a series of appointments. We take impressions of your mouth, and an accurate
model is made from these impressions. The lab uses this model to create a wax replica of the final denture, called a waxup.
 
Depending on the circumstances, we may have you try in the waxup, and we note any changes to the fit and to the color, shape, and placement of the teeth. We then send the waxup back to the lab, and they process it to create the final denture.
 
When the partial is ready, you try it in, and we make any necessary adjustments.
 
The benefits of a flexible partial
Flexible partial dentures have several benefits. They help stop the remaining neighboring teeth from shifting.
 
They balance your bite, so you chew better and have a healthier jaw joint. The denture is not bulky, so it fits comfortably, and the translucent materials blend in with natural tissues for a beautiful smile.

Precision Partial Dentures

 
Removable appliances
When many teeth in your upper or lower arch are missing, a precision partial denture is a good treatment for replacing them.
 
Precision partials are removable appliances that are held in place by special attachments that are fitted to your teeth. These attachments help hide the clasps, so they’re significantly less visible in your mouth.
 
With proper home care, regular adjustments and relines, your precision partial can provide a functional bite and a naturallooking smile.
 
Placing a precision partial denture
The process of making a partial denture varies in each case, and it usually involves a series of
appointments.
 
The first step in placing a precision partial is to shape the supporting teeth, so the attachments precisely fit them. Next, we take impressions of your mouth, including the prepared teeth.
 
An accurate model of your mouth is made from these impressions, and the lab uses this model to create the precision attachments.
 
Second, when the attachments are ready, we place them on your teeth and then take new impressions.
 
A new model is made, and the denture framework is made on this model to fit your bite and the attachments. In some cases, a wax rim is mounted on the framework for you to try in. This helps confirm the correct relationship between the upper and lower teeth.
 
Third, the lab then creates a wax replica of the final denture, called a waxup. Depending on the circumstances, we may have you try in the waxup, and we note any changes to the fit and to the color, shape and placement of the teeth. We send the waxup back to the lab, and they process it to create the final precision partial denture.
 
When the precision partial is ready, you try it in, and we make any necessary adjustments here in the office.
 
The benefits of a precision partial denture
Precision partials have several benefits. They help stop your remaining teeth from shifting. They balance your bite, so you chew better and have a healthier jaw joint. The dentures also provide support for your lips and cheeks, which helps you speak clearly. The precision attachments hold the dentures in place and help you look your best.

Conventional Denture

 
A conventional denture
When all your upper or lower teeth are missing, a full denture is a good treatment for replacing them.
 
With proper home care and regular adjustments and relines, your denture can provide a functional bite and a naturallooking smile.
 
Placing a full denture
The process of making a full denture varies in each case, and it usually involves a series of
appointments. The first step is to take impressions of your mouth. An accurate model
is made from these impressions, and the lab uses this model to create the denture base. In
many cases, a wax rim is mounted on the base for you to try in. This helps confirm the correct relationship between the upper and lower teeth.
 
The lab then creates a wax replica of the final denture, called a waxup. You will try in the waxup, and we will note any changes to the fit of the base and to the color, shape, and placement of the teeth. We then send the waxup back to the lab, and they process it to create the final denture.
 
When the denture is ready, you try it in, and we make any necessary adjustments.
 
The benefits of a full denture
Dentures have many benefits. When your natural teeth are missing, dentures enable you to eat nutritious foods more easily and to speak more clearly. In addition, they support your lips and cheeks for a more attractive and youthful appearance.