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Endodontics

Why is Root canal treatment recommended ?

When the pulp of a tooth becomes infected, abscessed or dies, root canal therapy is necessary to save the tooth. It is generally comfortable treatment that can save your tooth and keep your mouth Healthy.
 
Symptoms of infection
You may realize that you have an infected tooth when— the tooth is sensitive to hot or cold.
the tooth hurts with biting or pressure. there is throbbing, severe tooth pain. the area is swollen. you have a bad taste in your mouth. 
 
Causes of infection
The pulp becomes infected and an abscess occurs when bacteria invade the inner layers of the tooth, exposing the nerve. The tooth pulp is a soft tissue made up of nerves and blood vessels. It is contained in the pulp chamber that extends from the middle of the tooth down through the tooth roots.
Infection and abscesses occurs most commonly through a deep cavity that allows bacteria through the enamel and dentin layers and
into the pulp. Sometimes the pulp simply dies due to a fracture or a blow to the tooth.
 
Diagnosis and treatment
To determine if your tooth has an infected pulp, we do a thorough examination. The exam often includes xrays and sometimes includes checking the health of the pulp with a pulp tester. We may also apply heat or cold, tap lightly on the tooth to see if it is sensitive, look for changes in the tooth’s color, or press gently on the gums next to the tooth to check for pain.
If we determine that you have an infected tooth, we talk with you about root canal therapy to remove the infection .

What is Pulpitis ?

Any time the pulp of a tooth has been injured or irritated, there is a possibility that it may become swollen and painful. This inflammation is called pulpitis. Treating the condition will relieve discomfort and restore the health of your mouth. 
 
Symptoms of pulpitis
You may realize that you have an inflamed tooth when:
The tooth is sensitive to hot, cold, or pressure. The tooth hurts with biting. There is throbbing tooth pain. The area is swollen. The tooth is loose. You have a bad taste in your mouth. You may also be unaware of the problem because there are no symptoms at all. 
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Causes of pulpitis
The tooth pulp is a soft tissue made up of nerves and blood vessels. It is contained in the pulp chamber that extends from the middle of the tooth down through the tooth roots. The pulp can become inflamed for a number of reasons. Occasionally, placing a filling, crown, or other restoration close to the pulp can cause inflammation. Other times, the pulp may become inflamed due to an injury. In both these cases, the pulp may calm down on its own, but sometimes it can die or become infected and abscessed. The pulp also can become infected when tooth decay destroys the outer layers of the tooth and allows bacteria to invade the pulp
layer. Sometimes the condition occurs for no apparent reason.
 
Diagnosis and treatment
To select the best treatment, we do a thorough examination. The examination often includes xrays and sometimes includes checking the health of the pulp with a pulp tester. We may also apply heat or cold, tap lightly on the tooth to see if it is sensitive, look for changes in the tooth’s color, or press gently on the gums next to the tooth to check for pain.
If the pulp is mildly inflamed, we may recommend treatments to ease any discomfort and help the tooth heal.
 
If the pulp cannot heal itself or is infected, we recommend root canal therapy to remove the infection and save the tooth. 
 

What are the alternatives to Root canal therapy ?

Once the inner pulp layer of a tooth has become infected or abscessed, your choices are imited. You could choose to — extract the tooth or delay treatment.  Save the tooth with root canal therapy. 
 
Extracting the tooth
An extraction is only a short term solution because teeth need each other for support. While an extraction does remove the infection, a missing tooth sets off a chain reaction of shifting teeth, receding jawbone, increased risk for decay and gum disease, and other dental roblems.
 
Delaying treatment
If you choose to delay treatment, you should know that an infected tooth will never heal on
its own. As the infection spreads down the tooth and into your jawbone, the pain may become excruciating. The infection also can become more widespread and potentially threaten your life.
Choosing root canal therapy
When the pulp of the tooth has been infected, root canal therapy is the best choice for removing infection, saving your tooth, and keeping your mouth and smile healthy. 
 

What instructions to follow after the root canal appointment ?

Now that you have had root canal therapy, it is important to follow these recommendations to
ensure healing. If we placed a temporary filling or crown on your tooth, avoid chewing for at least 30 minutes to allow the restoration to harden. To keep your temporary restoration in place, avoid eating hard or sticky foods, especially chewing gum. If possible, chew only on the
opposite side of your mouth. It is not a problem for a small portion of a temporary filling to tear away or break off, but if the entire filling wears out, or if a temporary crown comes off, call Dr. Doshi so that it can be replaced.
Chewing and eating
If we used an anesthetic during the procedure, avoid chewing until the numbness has  completely worn off. Your lips, teeth, and tongue may be numb for several hours.
Brushing and flossing
Brush and floss normally.
 
Medications and discomfort
If antibiotics were prescribed, continue to take them for the indicated length of time, even if all symptoms and signs of infection are gone. To control discomfort, take pain medication before the anesthetic has worn off or as recommended. It is normal to experience some discomfort for several days after a root canal appointment, especially when chewing. To further reduce discomfort or swelling, rinse your mouth three times a day with warm salt water. Use about one teaspoon of salt per glass of warm water.
When to call us
Call our office if your bite feels uneven, if you have sensitivity or discomfort that increases or continues beyond three or four days, if your temporary filling or crown comes off, or if you have any questions or concerns.
 
 

 

What is Pulp Capping treatment ?

Whenever we must place a restoration close to the pulp of a tooth, there is a possibility that
the pulp can become irritated or inflamed. In some cases, we may be able to keep the pulp
healthy with a pulp capping procedure.
 
The procedure
The pulp capping procedure is used after decay has been removed from the tooth and before we place the filling, crown, or other restoration. The first step is to determine whether pulp
capping is right for your tooth. We confirm that there is no pain in the tooth and that the pulp
is healthy and free of infection.
 
After we make sure that all the decay has been removed, we clean and disinfect the area. Then a special material is placed over the pulp chamber. This stimulates the inner tooth structure to repair itself and seal bacteria out of the pulp chamber. Depending on your situation, we may place a temporary restoration, or we may place the final filling or crown.
After the procedure is complete, we monitor the tooth for several months to make sure the pulp is healing.
 
The benefits of pulp capping when pulp capping is successful, the procedure can soothe a tooth’s irritated pulp and help it to heal, seal out bacteria, and prevent the need for root canal therapy. 
 

What is Root Canal Retreatment ?

In some cases, root canal therapy doesn’t completely heal an infected tooth, and root canal retreatment becomes necessary. There are several reasons why the infected tooth may
not have healed completely. The tooth may have canals that are difficult to clean because they are narrow, curved, or branched. The tooth may have extra root canals that were not discovered the first time. Tooth decay or a fracture can expose the filling material in the roots to bacteria, causing new infection.
Sometimes there is no apparent reason.
 
The procedure
We start the retreatment procedure by numbing the area to make you comfortable. We may also use a rubber dam to protect your mouth and ensure that nothing falls to the back of
your throat while we work. We make an opening through the top of the tooth and down into the pulp chamber. Then we remove the filling material that was previously placed in the root canals.
 
We carefully search for additional canals, remove any infection, and place new filling material in the canals. Last, depending on the circumstances, we seal the tooth with a small filling or replace the crown with a new one. The benefits of root canal retreatment
Root canal retreatment removes infection, relieves discomfort, and saves your tooth. With modern dental techniques, it is a generally comfortable and effective procedure. 
 

How many visits does it take for Root canal treatment ?

When the pulp layer of a tooth becomes infected, it is necessary to remove the infection with root canal therapy. It is a generally comfortable procedure that saves your tooth and gives you back your healthy smile.
 
The procedure
We start the procedure by numbing the area completely to keep you comfortable. We may also place a rubber dam around the infected tooth to protect your mouth and ensure that nothing falls to the back of your throat while we work. To get at the infected tooth pulp, we make an opening through the top of the tooth, down into the pulp chamber. We use a tiny instrument called a dental file to carefully clean out the infected tissue and shape the root canals to receive a filling material. To make sure that all of the infected pulp is removed, we may take xrays or use other instruments. Finally, we begin the steps necessary to restore the tooth. In most cases, we recommend placing a crown to protect and strengthen your tooth. If the tooth is severely broken down, it may be necessary to start by building up the tooth with a post and core.
 
The benefits of root canal therapy
Root canal therapy saves your tooth, prevents the spread of infection, and helps you maintain the health of your mouth. 

What is an Endodontic abscess ?

 
An endodontic abscess is a pocket of pus that forms in the jawbone at the tip of a tooth root.
An endodontic abscess is painful and can lead to much more serious conditions, but with prompt treatment, we can help you maintain a healthy mouth and body.
 
Symptoms of an endodontic abscess
You may realize that you have an endodontic abscess when— the tooth hurts when you tap or bite on it. you have a bad taste in your mouth. you experience pain and swelling. It is also possible that you can have an endodontic abscess and experience no symptoms at all.
The causes of an endodontic abscess
An endodontic abscess is caused by an infection of the pulp layer of the tooth. It becomes infected when bacteria, which are always present in the mouth, invade the pulp through deep cavities, a fractured or broken tooth, or an injury to the tooth. In some cases, there is no apparent reason. The infection can then spread from the pulp chamber, down the root canals, through the tip of the root, and into the jawbone, where the pus builds up and creates a hole in the bone. This is the abscess. The abscess creates pressure inside the bone and on the ligaments surrounding the tooth, and this can cause excruciating pain. Sometimes, the abscess drains near the infected tooth, forming a gumboil.
 
Diagnosis and treatment
It is important to treat an endodontic abscess because, if left untreated, the abscess can damage the adjacent soft tissue, lead to bone loss, be a continuing source of infection that drags down your immune system, and even be life threatening. To find an endodontic abscess, we perform a thorough examination, including xrays. We may also use an electric pulp tester to determine whether the pulp is inflamed or infected.
An infected tooth will never heal on its own, so we remove the infection with root canal therapy, which allows the abscess to heal.  Occasionally, however, the infection continues to grow after treatment. In that case, we may retreat the tooth with root canal therapy or use a minor surgical procedure to stop the infection and restore the health of your tooth. 

Is Root canal needed on Tooth that had a crown done ?

If you have a crown, it was placed because the outside of the tooth was damaged and needed more than just a filling. But the crown doesn’t protect the inside of the tooth, called the pulp.
The pulp contains the nerves, blood and veins that keep the tooth alive. If this pulp
becomes infected or abscessed, it will need root canal therapy. Infected pulp will not heal on its own. If we don’t perform root canal therapy, the infection can spread and cause a painful
abscess.
 
When do we place a crown?
There is no way to predict when the need for root canal therapy might occur. But, because the tooth was damaged enough to need a crown, it is likely the pulp is in a compromised state.
In some cases, we may be able to enter through the crown. Once we clean and repair the root
canals, we can simply restore the crown much like we’d restore a natural tooth. Otherwise, we may have to remove the crown in order to remove the infected pulp and treat the roots. We’ll then need to create and place a new crown. Root canal therapy, even on a crowned tooth, is done to help save the tooth. It’s our goal to give you a healthy, beautiful smile.